Spiders

Spiders
Common NameSpider
Latin NameClass Araneae

How to get rid of this?.To get rid of pest problem under control, inspection is the first and foremost step.

Description:
Eight legs, two body regions, no wings or antennae. Three or four pairs of eyes.
Spiders are chelicerates, therefore arthropods. As arthropods they have: segmented bodies with jointed limbs, all covered in a cuticle made of chitin and proteins; heads that are composed of several segments that fuse during the development of the embryo. Being chelicerates, their bodies consist of two tagmata, sets of segments that serve similar functions: the foremost one, called the cephalotorax or prosoma, is a complete fusion of the segments that in an insect would form two separate tagmata, the head, and thorax; the rear tagma is called the abdomen or opisthosoma.

In spiders, the cephalothorax and abdomen are connected by a small cylindrical section, the pedicel. The pattern of segment fusion that forms chelicerates’ heads is unique among arthropods, and what would normally be the first head segment disappears at an early stage of development, so that chelicerates lack the antennae typical of most arthropods. In fact, chelicerates’ only appendages ahead of the mouth are a pair of chelicerae, and they lack anything that would function directly as “jaws”. The first appendages behind the mouth are pedipalps and serve different functions within different groups of chelicerates.

Spiders reproduce sexually and fertilization is internal but indirect, in other words, the sperm is not inserted into the female’s body by the male’s genitals but by an intermediate stage. Unlike many land-living anthropods, male spiders do not produce ready-made spermatophores(packages of sperm), but spin small sperm webs on to which they ejaculate and then transfer the sperm to special syringe-like structures, papal bulbs or palpal organs, borne on the tips of the pedipalps of mature males. When a male detects signs of a female nearby he checks whether she is of the same species and whether she is ready to mate; for example in species that produce webs or “safety ropes”, the male can identify the species and sex of these objects by “smell”.

While most spiders pose little or no danger to people, some species can deliver venomous bites that may cause medical issues. In the U.S., the two most common venomous spiders are the brown recluse, distinguished by the violin-shaped marking on the top of its cephalothorax, the body part consisting the spider’s fused together head and thorax. The other important venomous spider is the black widow, notable for the red hourglass shape on the underside of its jet-black abdomen.

The only two species that cause great threat in our area are the Black Widow and the Yellow Sack Spider. The black widow is recognized by its slender legs, shiny black body and red hourglass shape on their abdomen. Yellow sack spiders are smaller, cream to yellow colored.

Most spiders enter the home from the outside. Some species have adapted to living in basements and other sheltered areas.

CALL NOW!Inspection is the first and foremost step!

REQUEST INSPECTION